THIS ISSUE  

Editor’s note: today marks the beginning of a new collaboration between FSWIR and Ecotextile News. FSWIR has often linked to articles in Ecotextile News, which is the environmental magazine for the global textile and clothing supply chain, but from this issue onward we will be highlighting key stories under the magazine’s banner. We are doing so because we believe Ecotextile News provides strong and independent commentary on sustainability-related issues affecting the fashion, apparel and textile industry.

Brands in this issue include: Asda (launches Re-Loved clothing trial), C&A and Carrefour (link to China transparency tool), Chicks (demo traces fibre-to-retail transactions), Forever 21 (sued for ‘stealing’ Ariana Grande’s name), H&M (re-markets damaged garments), H&M, C&A, Mango and Inditex (collected more than 30,000 tons of clothes in 2018), Kappahl (celebrates sustainability milestone), Kohl’s (new sustainability goals for 2025), Net-A-Porter (sustainability top of mind for latest emerging designer brands), Nike, H&M, Adidas, Primark and Walmart (named in new report on worker exploitation), Patagonia, Nike, Adidas, Toms and Levi’s (most sustainable brands on the market), Puma (teams up with Goonj to promote circular economy), Ruyi Group (only Chinese company in fashion pact), Selfridges (high-end sustainable fashion for a decent price), Starbucks and Bauer Hockey (probe illegal underpaying of migrant garment workers in Thailand), Tchibo (first major brand to use Green Button in Germany), The North Face (first Brewed Protein jacket), Uniqlo (working with ILO to support Asian workers), and more.

Recently released reports:

In general news:

  • Criticism of the “green button”: The state seal on clothing causes trouble

  • What’s the carbon footprint of a fashion show? No one really knows

  • The real cost of your blue jeans

  • Ethical cotton brings problems and opportunities

  • Is ethical clothing really expensive?

  • To insulate yourself from the trade war, stop buying new stuff

  • The pros and cons of the booming rental fashion industry

  • How sustainable fashion will affect Asia

  • Shop less, live more – save the planet. It doesn’t sound that bad to me

In the supply chain

  • Bangladesh: Readymade Sustainability Council (RSC) launches

  • Cambodia: Ministry extends deadline to propose minimum wage

  • Ethiopia: Japan backs Ethiopia’s effort to build up exports

  • India: textile jobs disappearing

  • Lesotho: groups force Lesotho clothing factories owner to end gender-based violence

Manufacturers in this issue include: Advance Denim (first Chinese denim maker to use Archroma’s aniline-free indigo), Mafatlal (new range of women’s fabrics), Navarpluma (using Applied DNA in down and feather supply chain), and more.

Sustainable fashion jobs: 7 new job listed this issue (at Arcadia Group, H&M, ISKO, Levi Strauss Foundation, NCBI Retail, Turnahead, and Vetta Brands). Interesting to see a Bangladesh manufacturer - Turnahead - seeking a sustainability manager (the first such instance I’ve seen.

By Stephen Frost, CUHK Business School, The Chinese University of Hong Kong.

FROM ECOTEXTILE NEWS 

Brands probe illegal underpaying of migrant garment workers: “Global brands Starbucks and Bauer Hockey are investigating claims that their garment suppliers in Thailand are illegally underpaying migrant workers from neighbouring Myanmar” (05 Sep).

Blockchain demo traces fibre-to-retail transactions: “Technological solutions provider TextileGenesis has partnered with Lenzing, the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and Asian apparel brand Chicks to demonstrate the fluency with which online transactions can be made using blockchain technology in the textile supply chain” (05 Sep).

Survey finds three quarters of consumers prefer ‘sustainable’ brands: “A survey conducted by product decision engine MakerSights has found that 73 per cent of American consumers prefer to purchase from environmentally friendly brands. The survey – made up of 1,457 respondents – also revealed that the use of recycled, ethically-sourced and generally ‘sustainable’ materials matter most to consumers in regards to apparel. Patagonia, Nike, Adidas, Toms and Levi’s were seen by participants as the most sustainable brands on the market, whilst additional brands which were frequently mentioned included Everlane, People Tree and Rothy’s Alternative Apparel” (05 Sep).

Good Fashion Fund launched: “A new funding platform initiated by Fashion for Good (FFG) has launched today that will focus on mobilising budding innovations within the textiles industry by providing the crucial capital needed to scale up such solutions … In partnership with C&A Foundation, Hong Kong-based The Mills Fabrica and investment advisory firm Fount, the Good Fashion Fund will hone in on accelerating the implementation of new, scalable solutions within India, Bangladesh and Vietnam” (04 Sep).

Podcast: Chemicals, climate change and greenwashing: ““More of the same is not going to get us to where we need to go,” said the ever-outspoken global fellow for the Institute for Public and Environmental Affairs Linda Greer at the recent Planet Textiles in Barcelona where she sat down alongside long-time Ecotextile News contributor Phil Patterson to discuss the direction of textile chemical management in global supply chains” (04 Sep).

H&M Group re-markets damaged garments: “The H&M Group has partnered with The Renewal Workshop to debut a new test collection made from unsold clothes that have been repaired and brought back to market through its COS (Collection of Style) branded stores” (03 Sep).

C&A and Carrefour link to China transparency tool: “NGO Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs (IPE) has revealed that C&A and Carrefour are the latest retailers to join its Green Supply Chain (GSC) map – an online transparency tool that monitors pollution incidents in China. This brings the total number of apparel retailers using the IPE tool to 12, alongside the likes of Puma, Levi Strauss, Gap and Nike” (03 Sep).

BRANDS & RETAILERS

Announcing The North Face “Moon Parka”, the world’s first outerwear jacket to utilize microbially-produced protein materials: “Goldwin and Spiber are pleased to announce that the Moon Parka outerwear jacket is set for a limited release on December 12, 2019. The Moon Parka utilizes structural protein materials that Goldwin and Spiber have been jointly developing since 2015 … The parka, with an outermost layer made from 100% jointly-developed Brewed Protein materials, is the world's first commercially available outerwear jacket to utilize structural proteins produced through a microbial fermentation process that does not rely on petrochemical resources” (05 Sep).

Green button: Tchibo first with state textile seal: “Tchibo will be the first major brand to use the Green Button, introduced in Berlin by the Federal Minister for Economic Cooperation and Development Dr. Gerd Müller” (05 Sep – in German). [Ed’s note: see here for a useful backgrounder by PFI in English on the Green Button initiative.]

Net-A-Porter names brands for latest Vanguard emerging designers programme: “What’s particularly interesting is that for the first time, each brand was scouted through Instagram. And the luxury e-tailer also said that “sustainability was top of mind during the selection process,” with Bite Studios and Naturae Sacra “both championing sustainable processes and materials in their production”” (05 Sep).

Kohl’s reveals new sustainability goals for 2025: “American department store chain Kohl’s announced on Wednesday that it has established a series of new sustainability goals to be achieved by 2025, focusing on three key areas: climate action, waste and recycling, and sustainable sourcing” (04 Sep).

Uniqlo chairman, ILO to support Asian workers: “The operator of the Uniqlo casual clothing chain says it will cooperate with the International Labour Organization to improve working conditions in Asian countries where the firm's factories are located. The Chairman and President of Fast Retailing, Tadashi Yanai, told NHK that his company has concluded a partnership agreement with the ILO” (04 Sep).

Fashion brands’ business practices undermining progress on ending garment worker exploitation: “Top fashion companies that are pledging to end worker exploitation in their global supply chains are hampering progress through their own irresponsible sourcing practices, concludes a new report published today on working conditions in the Southern Indian garment industry powerhouse. Short production windows, cost pressures and constant fluctuations in orders by brands and retail chains like Nike, H&M, Adidas, Primark and Walmart make it very difficult for local suppliers to comply with the standards on decent working practice that the companies say they expect” (03 Sep). [Ed’s note: see report here.]

Ariana Grande says Forever 21 ‘stole’ name in lawsuit: “Singer Ariana Grande is asking for $10m (£8.3m) in damages from Forever 21, saying the retailer “stole her name” to promote its clothing and beauty products. She said the firm published at least 30 “unauthorised” images and videos that suggested she had endorsed the brand. It also hired a model with an "uncanny" resemblance to Ms Grande for some of its social media posts, she said. Her lawsuit comes after a breakdown in talks over a joint marketing campaign” (03 Sep).

Selfridges’ Bright New Things designers AW19 offer high-end sustainable fashion for a decent price: ““A lot of people don't realise that if you buy a t-shirt for £20, someone — whether it is the guy who grows the cottons or makes it into the fabric — wasn't paid," fashion designer Charlotte Knowles told Selfridges. She is part of Selfridges' AW19 Bright New Things cohort: a group of sustainably-minded designers aiming to give the world high-quality fashion for a fair price” (03 Sep).

Asda launches Re-Loved clothing trial to encourage recycling: “Asda is trialling a sustainable fashion collection in its stores across the UK as the demand for eco-friendly fashion grows. The Big 4 grocer is helping to find new homes for unwanted clothes with the in-store Re-Loved charity clothing shop. The trial is due to run from today for the next four weeks” (02 Sep).

Puma teams up with Goonj to promote circular economy: “Puma has partnered Goonj in an effort to promote a circular economy in India. Puma has been witnessing strong growth in the Indian market and will be investing to expand its retail presence across India to maintain its dominant position. Puma sees India as an important market with huge growth potential. Goonj specialises in using urban surplus to trigger grassroots development work” (02 Sep).

H&M, C&A, Mango and Inditex collected more than 30,000 tons of clothes in 2018: “Large textile apparel companies such as H&M, C&A, Mango and Inditex collected 34,832 tonnes of clothing worldwide in 2018 through their recycling programs for presses in containers installed in their stores or for their home collection programs. Among the initiatives of companies in this regard, the Swedish fashion chain H&M stands out, which, since its campaign began in 2013 to collect garments of any brand and in any state for reuse and recycling, has managed to collect 75,000 tons of textiles , of which 10% have been collected in Spanish establishments” (01 Sep – in Spanish).

Ruyi Group, as the only company from mainland China, has signed a fashion pact with leading global fashion and textile enterprises: “Ruyi Group is the only company from Mainland China to sign the Fashion Pact. As the largest Group in China's textile industry, sustainable development has always been at the heart of Ruyi Group. From the environmentally friendly designs to sustainable production technology, Ruyi Group's vertical industrial chain has always aimed at sustainable development. With the belief of environmental protection, Ruyi Group is committed to a cleaner, safer, and greener sustainable fashion blueprint” (29 Aug).

Kappahl celebrates sustainability milestone with autumn denim ranges: “Swedish fashion retailer Kappahl has announced that with the launch of its autumn collections it has achieved its 2020 target of manufacturing 100 percent of its denim range “in more sustainable fabrics and using more sustainable production processes”” (29 Aug).

NEWS & REPORTS   

Criticism of the “green button”: The state seal on clothing causes trouble: “The state textile seal is due to start in [Germany in] early September. Some companies are initially excluded - because there are too few testing capacities” (03 Sep – in German). [Ed’s note: see here for a useful backgrounder by PFI in English on the Green Button initiative.]

What’s the carbon footprint of a fashion show? No one really knows: “It’s pretty rare that a Google search will yield zero answers. But that’s precisely what I found after typing in: “What is the carbon footprint of a fashion show?” The page pulled up 8 million “results,” but none of them were relevant; most of the articles were about fashion’s carbon footprint as a whole, or they zero in on a specific material, like cotton, not the emissions of a standard runway show. It isn’t Google’s fault for not delivering what I wanted; the answers simply aren’t there. Maybe because we haven’t been looking for them” (03 Sep).

The real cost of your blue jeans: “Perhaps the worst offenders in terms of environmental and human damage are blue jeans. In this excerpt from Fashionopolis, [Dana] Thomas explores some of what ails the world's most popular garment of all—and one process that could help cure some of the ills plaguing their production” (03 Sep).

Ethical cotton brings problems and opportunities: “Ethical cotton is produced under controls just as rigorous as those for growing organic food. It is natural fibre, unadulterated by strong chemistry, by chlorine bleaching or by optical brighteners. It is traded fairly at every stage of the manufacturing chain, following the principles of minimum impact on the environment as far as carbon emission or chemical contamination is concerned. Leading hotel groups are now taking ethical standards into their purchasing decisions, not just for the ‘green and ethical’ image associated with this, but also because of the qualities of the ethical product itself. Hotel linen made from ethical cotton is pure 100% natural cotton fibre, with a delightful soft handle, excellent drape, superb ‘breathability’ for the sleeper in the bed and none of the symptoms of chemical modification or degradation that could be associated with its traditionally produced rivals. This presents a challenge for the contract launderer, because in order to preserve its ethical claim, it should be washed to the same standard as it is produced. This month we look at the implications for the laundry process and the consequences of these” (02 Sep).

Is ethical clothing really expensive? “We get it⁠—for a lot of people, one look at the price tag on an item of ethical clothing is enough to turn you off for good, but we are here to tell you that it shouldn’t. There are very good reasons why those little numbers seem an awful lot bigger than they do at the chain retailers down the road, and why we all, as conscious consumers, should push through the temporary pain for the long term gain” (02 Sep).

To insulate yourself from the trade war, stop buying new stuff: “There’s a growing awareness that our insatiable demand for stuff, whether that’s fast fashion, children’s toys, or new furniture, is fueling an environmental nightmare. All that stuff stresses us out and demands our mental and physical energy, too. Not buying new items in the coming month has benefits for your bank account and your well-being. And it might even make the trade war the Trump administration’s most environmentally friendly policy yet” (02 Sep).

The pros and cons of the booming rental fashion industry: “Let’s face it, we are ‘Generation Rent’. Millennials as marketers like to call us (i.e. 25 to 34-year-olds) are not buying property nowadays, with renting figures having trebled since the 1990s according to the Institute of Fiscal Studies. We are living in an age of virtual libraries where we stream music and films online, without needing to own any of them. Gone are the days of CD and DVD shelves piling high – nowadays we essentially ‘rent’ our entertainment. So why wouldn’t we be coveting the same concept for our wardrobes” (02 Sep).

How sustainable fashion will affect Asia: “The fashion industry is slowly transitioning to keep up with the demand of consumers looking for improved ethics. However, whilst a small section of the market is looking for sustainable clothing the vast majority of consumers continue to place greater value on price than on ethics. Increases in recycling services and new, smaller players entering the market will be the main areas for the foreseeable future” (02 Sep).

Shop less, live more – save the planet. It doesn’t sound that bad to me: “Women love shopping, don’t they? Everyone knows we were born to do it; that left to our own devices we like nothing better than spending all day in some changing room, leaving our menfolk slumped outside in abject boredom, praying for it to be over. Except it’s not true, or certainly not for all women, and almost certainly never has been. Only 29% of women actually say they enjoy shopping, according to the retail analysts Mintel; for most of the rest it’s somewhere between actively anxiety-inducing (especially for anyone uncomfortable with stripping in front of a mirror) and merely rather boring” (31 Aug).

SUPPLY CHAIN 

Bangladesh

New platform launches today: “The launching of a top body for supervising safety and compliance in the garment sector, in continuation of the post-Rana Plaza collapse remediation process, might be announced today. Representatives of different bodies have been holding meetings over the last two days to form RMG Sustainability Council (RSC). They are scheduled to announce the terms, conditions and operational modalities at a press briefing following a meeting” (03 Sep).

  • European fashion brands agree new deal in Bangladesh: “European fashion brands who buy readymade garments from Bangladesh agreed on Tuesday to hand over responsibility for issues like worker safety to a new body called the Readymade Sustainability Council (RSC). RSC, governed by the Bangladesh Garment Manufacturers and Exporters Association (BGMEA), and brands and workers’ representatives, will replace the Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh to ensure compliance with work-place monitoring in the industry” (04 Sep).

Cambodia

Ministry extends deadline to propose minimum wage: “The Ministry of Labour and Vocational Training on Tuesday gave unions and the Garment Manufacturers Association in Cambodia (GMAC) until Friday to decide on their figures for the sector’s minimum wage for next year. Negotiations on next year’s minimum wage began on Tuesday” (04 Sep).

Ethiopia

Garment wars: Japan backs Ethiopia’s effort to build up exports: “Japanese trading house Itochu will provide support for Africa’s textile industry, starting in Ethiopia, which has emerged as an alternative production base to Asia, Nikkei has learned. Apparel production has been shifting from China to other Asian countries, such as Myanmar. But rising wages in Asia have increased the appeal of Africa, which offers substantial savings on personnel” (17 Aug).

India

1.2 lakh textile jobs in Tamil Nadu lost in one year? “The textile industry, which is the second-largest employer in the country, is reeling under a severe crisis similar to the one witnessed in the automobiles sector across India. In the April-June quarter, export of cotton yarn plunged … 34 per cent. “In the past one year alone, 300 spinning and open-end mills in Tamil Nadu have shut down for various reasons. Some of them have been sold out,” says M Jayabal, president of TN Open-end Spinning Mills Association (OSMA)” (21 Aug).

  • A third of India’s textile workers — 30 million— lost their jobs and more could go: “India’s textile industry, which employs 100 million workers is the second largest to generate employment opportunities. Roughly a third of spinning mills have shutdown amid slowdown in export and domestic sales — leading to huge job losses The cotton yarn export fell by 34.6% at $696 million in the quarter ending in June, shows the Directorate General of Commercial Intelligence and Statistics (DGCI&S)” (22 Aug).

Lesotho

Groups force Lesotho clothing factories owner to end gender-based violence: “A landmark alliance of unions and women’s rights groups in the Southern African nation of Lesotho teamed up to pressure a Taiwanese factory owner into signing a pact to end gender-based sexual harassment and violence at its plants, the director of the AFL-CIO’s Solidarity Center says. In an August 29 interview with Chris Garlock on WPFW’s Your Rights At Work, center Executive Director Shawna Bader-Blau said the pact, which she called “a collective bargaining agreement,“ covers 10,000 female garment workers toiling in large factories owned by Nien Hsing Textiles, a major supplier for western brands Levi Strauss, The Children’s Place and Kontoor” (03 Sep).

MANUFACTURERS   

Applied DNA extends textiles business to include global down and feather supply chain in partnership with industry leader Navarpluma: “Applied DNA Sciences, a leader in PCR-based DNA manufacturing for product authenticity and traceability solutions, announced today a sales and marketing partnership with Navarpluma that extends Applied DNA’s Textiles business to include the global down and feather supply chain” (05 Sep).

Advance Denim to launch aniline-free collection: “Archroma, a leader in colour and specialty chemicals towards sustainable solutions, has announced that Advance Denim will be the first Chinese denim manufacturer to offer a collection made with Archroma’s aniline-free Denisol Pure Indigo” (04 Sep).

WWF’s water stewardship transforming textile sector: “WWF has established water stewardship projects in several countries, including India, China, Vietnam and Turkey, with the support of international brands and local partners. The initiative on water stewardship in the textile sector has been on since 2011. The aim is to improve freshwater ecosystems and water governance in key basins for healthy living” (02 Sep).

Mafatlal launches Mohinee, a new range of women’s fabrics: “The company will focus on the environment friendliness and breathability of the fabrics for their sheer comfort and drapes. The product mix is developed to cater to requirements of premium and mid segments of the market. The company also plans to introduce a multi fiber concept comprising of several new generation fibers like modal, viscose, Tencel, linen, flax, bamberg, etc.” (02 Sep).

PRO Ecuador collaborates with Indian textile manufacturers: “PRO Ecuador, a part of the ministry of production, foreign trade, investment, and fisheries, under the Government of Ecuador, has been collaborating with Indian textile manufacturers like Raymond, Blackberry, SS Homme etc., to drive the use of Corozo, also known as Vega Ivory, to promote green clothing and drive sustainable clothing trends in India” (29 Aug).

SUSTAINABLE FASHION JOBS

[New listings or updated information marked with *]

Amaro: Sustainability & Social Impact Lead (São Paulo)

Amazon: Social Responsibility, Senior Program Manager (Shenzhen, China)

* Arcadia Group: Ethical Trade Manager (London)

Ascena: Analyst Community & Philanthropy (New York)

Asos: Ethical Trade Assistant (Hong Kong)

BSR: HERproject Associate (Hong Kong)

BSR: Manager, Supply Chain Sustainability (New York)

C&A Sourcing: Chemicals Project Manager (Hong Kong)

C&A Sourcing: SSC Manager for China Sourcing Office (Shanghai)

C&A Foundation: Data Analyst (Gurgaon)

Canada Goose: Manager Fabrics Research, Development, Sustainability (Toronto)

Canada Goose: Sustainability Programs Specialist (Toronto)

Canada Goose: Sr. Materials Developer, Fabric Research, Development & Sustainability (Toronto)

CIEL Textile Company: Sustainability Officer (Mauritius)

Center for Child Rights and Corporate Social Responsibility (CCR CSR): Social Worker (Shenzhen)

Copenhagen Fashion Week: Bæredygtighedspraktikant (Copenhagen)

Cutso: Lead Developer - Sustainable Fashion Marketplace (London)

Decathlon China: Supplier Quality Engineer (Shenzhen)

Disney: Director, Environmental Science And Policy Analysis (Glendale, CA)

Disney: Manager, Audit Analysis, ILS (Glendale, CA)

Global Brands Group: Social & Environmental Affairs Assistant (London)

Global Brands Group: Social & Environmental Affairs Officer (London)

Good Weave: Director, Apparel and Fashion Jewelry (Washington DC)

GoodWeave: Program Assistant (Washington DC)

Guess: Apparel Testing & Environmental Sustainability Specialist (Bioggio)

* H&M: Country - Sustainability Developer (Environment) (Guangzhou)

House of Anita Dongre: Fashion Designer – Sustainability (Mumbai)

Hugo Boss: Corporate Sustainability Manager (Metzingen)

ÏDKIDS: CSR Internship (Supplier Social Audits) (Pas-en-Artois)

Impactt: Senior Consultant – Social Auditing (London)

* ISKO: CSR Marketing Expert (London)

JCPenney: Project Specialist – Corporate Social Responsibility (Plano, TX)

Kmart Australia: Human Rights Manager (Melbourne)

* Levi Strauss Foundation: Program Coordinator (San Francisco, CA)

Li & Fung: Assistant Manager - Vendor Compliance (Hong Kong)

Lojas Renner: Sustainability Environmental Analyst (Shanghai)

Lululemon: Director, Chemicals & Materials Sustainability (Vancouver)

Michael Kors: Manager, Corporate Social Responsibility (New York)

Nakd: Corporate Social Responsibility Internship (Gothenburg)

* NCBI Retail: Corporate Sustainability Manager (Naas)

Nike: Environmental Health & Safety Manager - Air MI (Phoenix, AZ)

Nike: Community Impact Director Latam (Mexico City)

Pegas Nonwovens: Global Safety, Regulatory and Sustainability Specialist (Znojmo)

PVH: Corporate Responsibility Coordinator (Amsterdam)

PVH: Manager, Environmental Sustainability & Product Stewardship (New York)

Ralph Lauren: Manager, Sustainability (New York)

Ralph Lauren: Associate, Global Employee Communications & Philanthropy (New York)

QuizRR: Internal Sales Representative (Stockholm)

REI: Director, Communications and Public Affairs (Kent WA)

s.Oliver: Senior Global Sustainability Manager Environment & Chemical Compliance (Rottendorf)

SAXX Underwear: Product Quality and Compliance Manager (Portland, OR)

Solidarity Center: Senior Specialist for Organizing – Trade Union Strengthening Department (Phnom Penh)

Superdry: Executive Assistant to Sourcing and Sustainability Director (Cheltenham)

Sustainable Apparel coalition: Operations Coordinator, Europe (Amsterdam)

TAL Apparel: Environmental Sustainability Executive (Hong Kong)

Tommy Hilfiger: Communications Manager Sustainability (Amsterdam)

* Turnahead: Sustainability Manager (Bangladesh)

University of Leeds: Research Fellow in Sustainable Materials and Renewable Fibres (Leeds)

Unravelau: Internship Sustainability Researcher (Utrecht)

Velcro Companies: EHS Manager (Somersworth, NH)

* Vetta Brands: Corporate Social Responsibility & Sustainability Analyst (Columbus, OH)

VF: Manager, Worker Rights (Hong Kong)

Walmart: Senior Manager, Corporate Social Responsibility (Beijing)

WSR: Director of Outreach and Communications (New York)

ZDHC: Legal Intern (Amsterdam)

CONFERENCES & SEMINARS                                        

[New listings or updated information marked with *]  

08 September, Dhaka, Bangladesh: GOTS Bangladesh Seminar 2019: “The theme of this year´s seminar is ‘Connecting for Success’. In 2018, Bangladesh reached second position (after India) in terms of GOTS certified facilities in the country. This growth trend showcases the commitment of the Bangladeshi textile industry to not only use organic fibres, but also to environmental and social compliances. Fire and Building Safety are included in GOTS criteria and the country has made significant progress in all these areas.” Speaking opportunities available: contacts at link. Click here to register.

10 September, Webinar: See What’s New – C2C Certified Version 4 Draft Standard: “introduce the Cradle to Cradle Certified Version 4 draft standard … free webinar.”

11 September, Webinar: See What’s New – C2C Certified Version 4 Draft Standard: “introduce the Cradle to Cradle Certified Version 4 draft standard … free webinar.”

12 September, Webinar: See What’s New – C2C Certified Version 4 Draft Standard: “introduce the Cradle to Cradle Certified Version 4 draft standard … free webinar.”

12 September, Shanghai: Environmental Awareness Training: “Know the requirements to control & reduce the environmental risks in the textile wet processing units, and understand how to better address critical topics such as Chemical Management and Wastewater Management in the factory with Effluent Treatment Plant.”

17 September, Hong Kong: Environmental Awareness Training: “Know the requirements to control & reduce the environmental risks in the textile wet processing units, and understand how to better address critical topics such as Chemical Management and Wastewater Management in the factory with Effluent Treatment Plant.”

17 – 18 September, Northampton, UK: Leather Training Course: “The improved understanding you will gain from this leather course will help you avoid problems when sourcing and specifying leather products as well as providing confidence when dealing with suppliers, manufacturers and tanners.”

19 September, Hong Kong: Chemical Management Training: “What are the key requirements in terms of proper chemical management in a textile factory to reduce the environmental & social risks?”

20 – 21 September, Dhaka, Bangladesh: Global Textile Forum – Gearing up for New Generation Textiles: “Global Textile Forum is an initiative, a platform to promote region’s textile and garment industry through Collaborative efforts.”

20 – 21 September: Sacramento: WB/Camp on Water-Based Printing: “first-of-its-kind summit on water-based ink printing, powered by the Specialty Graphic Imaging Association’s (SGIA) THREADX conference. Hosted by Motion Textile.”

09 October, Northampton, UK: Leather Training Course: “The improved understanding you will gain from this leather course will help you to avoid problems when sourcing and specifying leather products as well as providing confidence when dealing with suppliers, manufacturers, and tanners.”

09 – 10 October, San Diego: The Responsible Business Summit West 2019: “The Responsible Business Summit West focuses on what business needs to do to show leadership on key social and environmental challenges and opportunities.”

10 October, Northampton, UK: Chemical Compliance and Product Safety Training Course: “On this chemical course, our in-house chemical expert will guide you through the various legislations and chemicals in a simple step-by-step process, ensuring that you are aware of your obligation and how to comply.”

11 October, Coimbatore: Top Ten Best Practices – ZDHC: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should contact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

15 – 18 October: Vancouver: Textile Exchange Sustainability Conference: Driving impact through integrity and preferred fiber & materials.

16 October, Delhi: Top Ten Best Practices – ZDHC: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should con tact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

21 – 25 October, Turin: International Labour Standards and Corporate Social Responsibility: “course offered by the International Training Centre of the ILO.”

23 October, Dhaka: Higg FEM 3.0 training: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should contact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

23 – 24 October: Amsterdam: European Textile Polyester Summit 2019: “an insight into the European polyester market and its drivers and developments, as well as focus on feedstock availability and sustainability challenges.”

29 October, Shanghai: Top Ten Best Practices – ZDHC: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should contact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

29 – 30 October: Washington DC: “Brands Taking Stands – What’s next?”: “bringing corporate leaders together on a fast-paced main stage, keenly focused on the ‘why’ and ‘how’ behind their thinking.”

30 October, Istanbul: Top Ten Best Practices – ZDHC: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should con tact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

01 November: Hong Kong: Crisis Management & Modern Slavery: “[The Mekong Club’s] intensive 3.5-hour workshop will equip you with the right tools to anticipate and prepare for a crisis, and teach you how to use crisis management principles effectively. A realistic modern slavery crisis scenario will be used so participants can practice these principles.”

04 – 05 November: Stockholm: Transforming Products for the Circular Economy: “This two-day forum will feature leading innovators, product designers, manufacturers and brands using Cradle to Cradle Certified to design and make safe, healthy materials and products for the circular economy.”

05 November: Dhaka, Bangladesh: Sustainable Apparel Forum: 2nd edition of a forum facilitated by the Bangladesh Apparel Exchange.

07 November, Chennai: 1 Day Chemical Compliance & Product Safety in the Supply Chain: “Manufacturers and suppliers who attend this one-day course can understand the importance of RSL and MRSL obligations for their business, key restricted substances and topical global legislation, as well as best practice guidance for implementation of MRSL compliance to satisfy the leather, footwear and apparel industries.”

12 – 14 November, San Jose, California: BSR Conference: “The 27th annual BSR Conference, one of the longest-running and most prestigious sustainable business events. This year, we will explore the transformations that are creating a new climate for business and help to pave the way for companies, people, and planet to thrive in this era of rapid change.”

13 November, New York: Leather, Compliance & Sustainability New York Conference (held at Tapestry HQ): “Calling all brands and retailers: How to ensure your brand is compliant with chemistry legislation and can take advantage of the opportunity of adding value through sustainability.”

* 14 November, Brussels: Ready, Set, Substitute it Now!ChemSec invites you to a full-day event, which will include messages from policy makers, inspiration from progressive companies and hard facts from scientists, as well as panel discussions and workshops on how to best substitute hazardous chemicals.”

20 November, Delhi: Higg FEM 3.0 training: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should contact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

20 November, Hong Kong: Half Day Sustainability in the Leather Supply Chain Training Course: This half-day leather sustainability course covers key aspects of traceability and material sourcing, chemical management risks, environmental impacts and stewardship, NGO activity and the leather life cycle.”

22 November, Coimbatore: Higg FEM 3.0 training: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should contact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

26 November, Dhaka: Higg FEM 3.0 training: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should contact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

03 December, Northampton, UK: Leather Training Course: “The improved understanding you will gain from this leather course will help you to avoid problems when sourcing and specifying leather products as well as providing confidence when dealing with suppliers, manufacturers, and tanners.”

11 – 12 December, Istanbul: Chemical Management - ZDHC: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should contact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

11 – 12 February, Cologne: 1st International Conference on Cellulose Fibres: “New International Conference on Cellulose Fibres, the fastest growing fibre group in textiles, the largest investment sector in the bio-based economy and the solution for avoiding microplastics.”

11 March, London: Drapers Sustainable Fashion 2020: “[With a] focus on collaborating for change within the fashion retail industry.”

(Photo by Magann, CCO)

Disclaimer: The Fashion Sustainability Week in Review (FSWIR) is a twice-weekly roundup of sustainability news items relevant to the fashion, apparel, textile and related industries. The views and opinions expressed in the FSWIR by individual authors and/or media outlets cited do not necessarily reflect the position of GoBlu International or any individual associated with the company.

 

 

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