THIS ISSUE

Brands in this issue include: Folk (cult brand telling customers to wear out its clothes), H&M (launches Restored Collection), JCPenney and Macy’s (begin selling used clothing), Ralph Lauren, Prada, Saint Laurent, Balenciaga, Michael Kors and Burberry (industry leaders in the ‘Great Awokening’), Vin + Omi (collaborating with Prince Charles on nettle dresses), VF (stops buying Brazilian leather as Amazon burns), Zara (latest sustainability collection), and more.

In general news:

  • Time to make fast fashion a problem for its makers, not charities

  • How veganism is taking the step from kitchen to closet

  • Can fashion keep its cool … and help save the planet?

  • Is celebrity marketing making sustainable fashion more confusing?

  • Second-hand is the answer to sustainable fashion, says Oxfam

  • Smaller brands are making sustainability fashionable

  • G7 Fashion Pact: Sounds good, but...

  • Fast fashion’s carbons emissions ‘like driving car round world six times’

  • Burning issue: how fashion’s love of leather is fuelling the fires in the Amazon

  • The high price of fast fashion

  • Why organic cotton production is more than just sourcing from a farm

  • Can the fast fashion business model embrace sustainability?

  • How India’s new sustainable clothes movement is big news

  • Is Emmanuel Macron the unsung hero of sustainable fashion?

  • Handloom weavers struggle! GST and unpaid dues from APCO are growing concerns

In the supply chain

  • Bangladesh: migrant workers suffer from rogue recruitment; BGMEA to form RMG Sustainability Council; and 700 workers terminated at SF Denim factory

  • Cambodia: minimum wage council selects vice presidents

Manufacturers in this issue include: Cone Denim (new collaboration with Crystal), Evolved By Nature (process to purify and solubilize silk protein), Hirdaramani Group (collaborates with Ellen MacArthur Foundation), Lenzing (fibers certified as fully biodegradable in water, soil and compost), and more.

Sustainable fashion jobs: 3 new job listed this issue (at C&A Sourcing, Li & Fung, and SAXX Underwear).

By Stephen Frost, CUHK Business School, The Chinese University of Hong Kong.

BRANDS & RETAILERS

Who Made My Clothes: How Gen Z ‘woke’ up luxury brands like Chanel and LV to fur-free and sustainable practices: “Ralph Lauren, Prada, Saint Laurent, Balenciaga, Michael Kors and Burberry feature among industry leaders in the ‘Great Awokening’ who are pushing for transparency in production, and banning the use of animal fur – thanks to the changing customer demographic” (01 Sep).

Prince Charles branches out into sustainable fashion with dresses made from nettles: “Prince Charles is breaking into fashion with an unexpected collaboration with Vin + Omi. The royal has worked with the designers on their latest collection which will debut at London Fashion Week. The prince's collaboration is tied to the Positive Fashion initiative, which seeks to make fashion more sustainable” (01 Sep).

‘It’s not fast fashion’: the cult brand telling customers to wear out its clothes: “Cathal McAteer, the founder of cult brand Folk, is trying on pieces from his new line, It’s All Good Folk, at his central London shop and HQ. He’s excited about the new collection. The first pieces went into John Lewis’s White City store that morning and he is visibly chuffed. He’s already wearing the trouser samples, which will go on sale in November, and it looks like he’ll be living in them for a while. He’s his own best customer. “I personally like a dishevelled, worn garment,” he says. “I like that patina things take on when they look well-worn”” (01 Sep).

H&M’s COS launches Restored Collection, “saves damaged garments”: “H&M as a group has been diving deep into sustainability in recent periods and has just announced that it’s “saving” damaged garments in its first-ever Restore Collection, which launches through its COS chain” (30 Aug).

From Patagonia to Everlane: how to fit the fashion system into a sustainable DNA: “What are the differences between Patagonia, Everlane, Reformation or Eileen Fisher from Inditex, H&M, PVH, Adidas or Kering? The fashion system is the same for both, but some elements make these brands referents in sustainability. Since day one, this companies base its strategies in being more eco, but, what does this mean?” (30 Aug).

Fashion Pact: NGOs say industry model needs to change: “The Fashion Pact presented on August 23 to French President Emmanuel Macron, and three days later at the Biarritz G7 meeting, is a unique document for the number of major groups that signed it, from fast-fashion giants H&M and Inditex to luxury groups Kering and Hermès, to sporting brands Nike and Adidas. However, NGOs remain sceptical about the Pact, which pledges efforts that rely solely on voluntary action, and whose implementation is yet to be discussed” (29 Aug).

These are the best jeans looks from Zara’s latest sustainability collection: “By 2025, the Spanish textile giant wants to process only all organic or recycled materials for all its eight brands, which include Zara and Pull & Bear, Bershka and Massimo Dutti. In addition, the water and energy consumption in the factories and worldwide branches should be reduced or come from sustainable sources such as hydropower, wind energy, solar energy, biomass or geothermal energy … This is an important step, especially since fast fashion companies such as Zara have been the subject of fierce criticism since the Rana Plaza factory downheat in Bangladesh and documentary films such as “True Cost””. (29 Aug – in German).

Owner of Timberland, Vans stops buying Brazilian leather as Amazon burns: “[VF] the U.S. parent company of apparel and shoe brands Timberland, Vans and the North Face will no longer buy Brazilian leather, it said on Thursday, as surging forest fires in the Amazon raise questions about how companies are contributing to the destruction of the world’s largest rainforest” (29 Aug).

Department stores begin selling used clothing: “According to “Sustainability in the Textile Industry,” almost 150 million tons of clothing sold globally every year, ends up in landfills. This is one of the reasons that department stores, like JCPenney and Macy’s, have decided to get into the recycle clothes business” (29 Aug).

NEWS & REPORTS   

Time to make fast fashion a problem for its makers, not charities: “Returning our old clothes to big fashion chains - rather than taking them to charity stores - could make fast fashion companies pay for their waste and fuel vital recycling research” (02 Sep).

How veganism is taking the step from kitchen to closet: “While an increasing number of Brits are trying to eat less meat, market researchers Mintel found in their latest fashion and sustainability report that the trend is now spreading from kitchen to closet. It found animal welfare came top of a list of issues that people said they considered before buying clothes, with 42% saying it was important to them” (01 Sep).

Can fashion keep its cool … and help save the planet? “The catwalk world of glamour and luxury hides a business that thrives on wasteful consumerism. Now the climate crisis is forcing a rethink” (31 Aug).

Is celebrity marketing making sustainable fashion more confusing? “The campaign in question may raise more consumer questions than answers. Am I buying this because it's sustainable? Am I buying this because I admire this celebrity? Should I be buying it at all? Brands like Patagonia are telling us not to buy anything new, but to repair instead. This is a much clearer message and it is obvious how this helps sustainability” (31 Aug).

Second-hand is the answer to sustainable fashion, says Oxfam: “The charity Oxfam contends that buying second-hand is not only more sustainable (undeniably, it utilizes no additional resources beyond transportation, compared to new clothing) but stylish, too. The photoshoot with model Stella Tennant and her daughter, Iris, was styled using clothing from Oxfam online and high street stores” (31 Aug).

Smaller brands are making sustainability fashionable: “In recent years, sustainability has become a gimmick used by fast-fashion retailers to reach young buyers. But smaller brands are still setting the standards for environment consciousness in the industry” (31 Aug).

G7 Fashion Pact: Sounds good, but...: “Even though the debate on the subject of sustainability is taking place on the part of the industry and above all the global players in the textile industry, criticism is being voiced that the Fashion Pact is a nice guideline for the industry, but it is not legally binding and therefore not effective. Another point of criticism is the problem of the supply chain. This is where most of the fashion industry's ecological footprint lies. Suppliers who produce the raw materials, textiles that are chemically treated, goods that are shipped to the end markets, intermediate suppliers who place orders with local factories in China, India or Bangladesh–these processes make the supply chains untransparent and need to be monitored even more.” (30 Aug).

Fast fashion’s carbons emissions ‘like driving car round world six times’: “New clothes bought in the UK produce more carbon emissions per minute than driving a car around the world six times, says Oxfam, in a claim that echoes Vivienne Westwood’s Big Issue message. The charity’s research found that the textile industry produces more greenhouse gas emissions than the shipping and aviation industries combined. They also reported that more than two tonnes of clothing are bought every minute in the UK with the emissions from buying one new white cotton shirt equating to driving a car for 35 miles” (30 Aug).

Burning issue: how fashion’s love of leather is fuelling the fires in the Amazon: “Beef and soya aren’t the sole culprits – our demand for shoes, belts and handbags is driving rainforest destruction. It’s time for consumers to wake up” (29 Aug).

The high price of fast fashion: “Workers and the environment suffer as trendy, inexpensive clothes are swiftly mass produced in subcontracted factories and sold in chain stores world-wide” (29 Aug).

Why organic cotton production is more than just sourcing from a farm: “In fact, when you put the word ‘organic’ in front of anything, even my own first instinct is ‘must be more expensive’. But organic cotton production is much more than that. Organic cotton goes far beyond the t-shirt on your back, or the bedsheets you sleep in. Organic cotton is part of a complete lifestyle that isn’t reflective of how much you earn, but rather how much you value your own health, other people’s (think cotton farmers) and the environment that it is farmed in” (29 Aug).

Can the fast fashion business model embrace sustainability? “We all know the trademarks of the fast fashion industry, the negative impact it leaves on the environment, the throwaway culture it breeds to satisfy the need for the new, and the waste is causes when unsold clothes end up in landfill. But by-product aside, the fast fashion business model may in fact have the answer that can circumvent disposability and produce clothes in a more sustainable way, if not ethical, way” (29 Aug).

How India’s new sustainable clothes movement is big news: “Have you ever thought that the travel jacket you just bought, or the bespoke chambray shirt on your back could will be contributing to environmental pollution? Yes, clothing is a huge source of environmental pollution — not many people know this — and, thankfully, India has just taken a huge step towards promoting a more sustainable approach to fashion” (29 Aug).

Is Emmanuel Macron the unsung hero of sustainable fashion? “Something unprecedented took place within the upper echelons of the luxury fashion multiverse last week. At the behest of French President Emmanuel Macron, an agreement that will see some of the world’s biggest fashion brands commit to reducing the industry’s carbon footprint was hatched” (28 Aug).

Handloom weavers struggle! GST and unpaid dues from APCO are growing concerns: “The condition of handloom weavers in the country is debilitating owing to several reasons including the introduction of GST and unpaid dues from AP State Handloom Weavers Cooperative Society (APCO)” (27 Aug).

SUPPLY CHAIN 

Bangladesh

Migrant workers suffer for rogue recruitment: “Lack of awareness on labour standards and ethical recruitment practices is a major factor which exacerbates vulnerabilities of migrants, analysts said yesterday. Labour intensive business models lead to adverse impacts arising from limited transparency in recruitment, working conditions and migration processes, they said” (01 Sep).

BGMEA set to form RMG Sustainability Council: “Bangladesh Garment Manufacturers and Exporters Association (BGMEA) is set to establish an RMG Sustainability Council in order to implement self-monitoring of the sector” (01 Sep).

700 workers terminated at SF Denim factory: “SF Denim Apparels, a readymade garment company in Dhaka, has terminated more than 700 of its workers without any prior notice and half of them were fired for their alleged involvement with formation of a trade union in the factory” (01 Sep).

  • Rights groups raise concerns over mass termination of RMG workers: “The rights groups have raised concerns over the mass termination of workers in the country's readymade garment (RMG) factories, with the latest incident of firing 701 workers by a single unit. The termination issue has also caused pressure from international arena, including International Labour Organisation (ILO) and Bangladesh's largest export destination - European Union (EU), resulting in risks of eroding trade benefits especially in EU, industry people said” (01 Sep).

Cambodia

Minimum wage council selects vice presidents: “The National Council for Minimum Wage yesterday selected two vice presidents to represent workers and employers as it officially begins discussions on the minimum wage for garment and footwear factory workers in 2020” (30 Aug).

MANUFACTURERS   

Stabilized, purified silk protein serves as green chemistry platform: “Scientists have long sought ways to take advantage of the high strength of natural silk protein in new materials, but its incorporation has been hindered by the inability to stabilize the protein in water. Now, a company known as Evolved By Nature (EBN; Boston, Mass.) has developed a process to purify and solubilize silk protein, allowing its use as a starting material for a host of different silk-based materials from the same chemistry platform” (01 Sep).

Lenzing fibers certified as fully biodegradable in water, soil and compost: “The Lenzing Group received confirmation of the full biodegradability of its fibers in fresh water by the independent research laboratory Organic Waste Systems (OWS). The new and existing international certifications conducted by OWS and issued by TÜV Austria verify that Lenzing Viscose fibers, Lenzing Modal fibers and Lenzing Lyocell fibers are biodegradable in all natural and industrial environments: in the soil, compost as well as in fresh and in marine water.” (30 Aug).

Hirdaramani Group and Ellen MacArthur Foundation drive the fashion industry’s shift towards a circular economy: “The Hirdaramani Group together with the Ellen MacArthur Foundation’s Make Fashion Circular initiative hosted a transformative workshop on Tuesday, 27 August at the Hilton Colombo Residences, specifically designed for academics and students in the fashion industry. The workshop was held to raise awareness, build knowledge, and stimulate dialogue within the context of a circular economy - one that designs out waste and pollution, keeps products and materials in use and regenerates natural systems” (29 Aug).

Cone Denim & Crystal launch new collaboration: “Cone Denim, a global leader in denim authenticity and sustainable innovation, is excited to announce the Crystal X Cone Collaboration. This exclusive collaboration with Crystal, a global leader in apparel manufacturing, brings together two global leaders in denim to provide a new level of sustainable denim solutions and fabric offerings. Cone Denim will preview the Collection at the Kingpins China City Tour trade show September 4th and 6th” (29 Aug).

Cleaning up after fast fashion: “In order to address this challenge, Professor Seshadri Ramkumar at Texas Tech Department of Environmental Toxicology and lead scientist at the Nonwovens and Advanced Materials Laboratory, and doctoral candidate Lihua Lou have found a safer, affordable, and sustainable means of removing toxic dye from wastewater using nanofiber webs and visible light” (28 Aug).

A.I. makes nylon production way more sustainable: “A new method could make producing the precursor to nylon much more environmentally friendly, researchers report” (27 Aug).

SUSTAINABLE FASHION JOBS

[New listings or updated information marked with *]

Achille Pinto Spa: Sustainability Manager (Como)

Amaro: Sustainability & Social Impact Lead (São Paulo)

Amazon: Social Responsibility, Senior Program Manager (Shenzhen, China)

Ascena: Analyst Community & Philanthropy (New York)

Asos: Ethical Trade Assistant (Hong Kong)

BSR: HERproject Associate (Hong Kong)

BSR: Manager, Supply Chain Sustainability (New York)

* C&A Sourcing: Chemicals Project Manager (Hong Kong)

C&A Sourcing: SSC Manager for China Sourcing Office (Shanghai)

C&A Sourcing: Environmental Project Manager (Hong Kong)

C&A Sourcing: Specialist - Sustainable Chemicals Management (Bengaluru).

C&A Foundation: Data Analyst (Gurgaon)

Calvin Klein: Director, Corporate Social Responsibility (New York)

Canada Goose: Manager Fabrics Research, Development, Sustainability (Toronto)

Canada Goose: Sustainability Programs Specialist (Toronto)

Canada Goose: Sr. Materials Developer, Fabric Research, Development & Sustainability (Toronto)

Canada Goose: Corporate Citizenship Department Coordinator (Toronto)

CIEL Textile Company: Sustainability Officer (Mauritius)

Center for Child Rights and Corporate Social Responsibility (CCR CSR): Social Worker (Shenzhen)

Centric Brands: Global Sourcing & Compliance Analyst (New York)

Columbia: prAna Sourcing Analyst (Carlsbad, CA)

Copenhagen Fashion Week: Bæredygtighedspraktikant (Copenhagen)

Cutso: Lead Developer - Sustainable Fashion Marketplace (London)

Decathlon China: Supplier Quality Engineer (Shenzhen)

Disney: Director, Environmental Science And Policy Analysis (Glendale, CA)

Disney: Manager, Audit Analysis, ILS (Glendale, CA)

Fjällräven: Brand Experience Coordinator (Stockholm)

Fur Europe: EU Policy and Environment Intern (Belgium)

Global Brands Group: Social & Environmental Affairs Assistant (London)

Global Brands Group: Social & Environmental Affairs Officer (London)

Global Fashion Agenda: Sustainability intern (Copenhagen)

Good Weave: Director, Apparel and Fashion Jewelry (Washington DC)

GoodWeave: Program Officer (Washington DC)

Groupe ETAM: Sustainability Manager (Hong Kong)

Guess: Apparel Testing & Environmental Sustainability Specialist (Bioggio)

Gymshark: Sustainability Manager (Solihull)

H&M: Sustainability Developer (Yangon)

House of Anita Dongre: Fashion Designer – Sustainability (Mumbai)

Hugo Boss: Corporate Sustainability Manager (Metzingen)

Hugo Boss: Sustainability & Innovation Manager (Metzingen)

ÏDKIDS: CSR Internship (Supplier Social Audits) (Pas-en-Artois)

Impactt: Senior Consultant – Social Auditing (London)

Interface: Global Director of Life Cycle Assessments (Atlanta, GA)

JCPenney: Project Specialist – Corporate Social Responsibility (Plano, TX)

Kmart Australia: Human Rights Manager (Melbourne)

L Brands: Government Affairs Specialist (Columbus, OH)

* Li & Fung: Assistant Manager - Vendor Compliance (Hong Kong)

Lojas Renner: Sustainability Environmental Analyst (Shanghai)

Lululemon: Director, Chemicals & Materials Sustainability (Vancouver)

Michael Kors: Manager, Corporate Social Responsibility (New York)

MV Sport: Global Social Compliance Manager (Bay Shore, NY)

Nakd: Corporate Social Responsibility Internship (Gothenburg)

Nike: Integrated Performance Senior Manager, Sustainable Manufacturing & Sourcing (Beaverton, OR)

Nike: Ethics & Compliance Manager, Greater China (Shanghai)

Nike: Environmental Health & Safety Manager - Air MI (Phoenix, AZ)

Nike: Project Manager, Social Community Impact APAC (Tokyo)

Nike: Community Impact Director Latam (Mexico City)

Patagonia: Head of Supply Chain Environmental Responsibility (Ventura, CA)

Pebbles: Manager Maatschappelijk Verantwoord Ondernemen (Alkmaar)

Pegas Nonwovens: Global Safety, Regulatory and Sustainability Specialist (Znojmo)

Primark: Sustainability Materials Sourcing Manager (County Dublin)

Primark: Sustainability Materials Coordinator (County Dublin)

PVH: Corporate Responsibility Coordinator (Amsterdam)

PVH: Manager, Environmental Sustainability & Product Stewardship (New York)

QHQ: Sustainability and CSR Technologist (London)

Ralph Lauren: Manager, Sustainability (New York)

Ralph Lauren: Associate, Global Employee Communications & Philanthropy (New York)

Puma: Officer Social Sustainability (Guangzhou)

QuizRR: Internal Sales Representative (Stockholm)

REI: Director, Communications and Public Affairs (Kent WA)

s.Oliver: Senior Global Sustainability Manager Environment & Chemical Compliance (Rottendorf)

* SAXX Underwear: Product Quality and Compliance Manager (Portland, OR)

SML: Manager – Global Sustainability (Hong Kong)

Solidarity Center: Senior Specialist for Organizing – Trade Union Strengthening Department (Phnom Penh)

Solidarity Center: Deputy Country Program Director (Phnom Penh)

Superdry: Executive Assistant to Sourcing and Sustainability Director (Cheltenham)

Superdry: Energy and Environment Manager (Cheltenham)

Sustainable Apparel coalition: Operations Coordinator, Europe (Amsterdam)

TAL Apparel: Environmental Sustainability Executive (Hong Kong)

Tchibo: (Senior) Project Manager Sustainability (Hamburg)

Tommy Hilfiger: Communications Manager Sustainability (Amsterdam)

Uniqlo: Sustainability Officer (Bangkok)

University of Leeds: Research Fellow in Sustainable Materials and Renewable Fibres (Leeds)

Unravelau: Internship Sustainability Researcher (Utrecht)

Velcro Companies: EHS Manager (Somersworth, NH)

VF: Sustainability Trainee (Stabio)

VF: Manager, Worker Rights (Hong Kong)

Walmart: Senior Manager, Corporate Social Responsibility (Beijing)

Welspun: Head - Group Sustainability (Mumbai)

White Stuff: Foundation Manager (London)

WSR: Director of Outreach and Communications (New York)

ZDHC: Legal Intern (Amsterdam)

CONFERENCES & SEMINARS                                        

[New listings or updated information marked with *]  

04 September, Northampton: 1 Day Sustainability in the Leather Supply Chain Training Course: “An introductory one-day leather sustainability course covering supply chain management, traceability and materials sources, the leather making process, chemical management risks, environmental impacts and stewardship, NGO activity and the leather life cycle.”

05 September, Shanghai: How to assess a factory on Social, Health & Safety and Quality issues: “Be able to grasp the overall vision of an efficient quality process and avoid the critical non conformities in terms of social and health & safety performance.”

08 September, Dhaka, Bangladesh: GOTS Bangladesh Seminar 2019: “The theme of this year´s seminar is ‘Connecting for Success’. In 2018, Bangladesh reached second position (after India) in terms of GOTS certified facilities in the country. This growth trend showcases the commitment of the Bangladeshi textile industry to not only use organic fibres, but also to environmental and social compliances. Fire and Building Safety are included in GOTS criteria and the country has made significant progress in all these areas.” Speaking opportunities available: contacts at link. Click here to register.

10 September, Webinar: See What’s New – C2C Certified Version 4 Draft Standard: “introduce the Cradle to Cradle Certified Version 4 draft standard … free webinar.”

11 September, Webinar: See What’s New – C2C Certified Version 4 Draft Standard: “introduce the Cradle to Cradle Certified Version 4 draft standard … free webinar.”

12 September, Webinar: See What’s New – C2C Certified Version 4 Draft Standard: “introduce the Cradle to Cradle Certified Version 4 draft standard … free webinar.”

12 September, Shanghai: Environmental Awareness Training: “Know the requirements to control & reduce the environmental risks in the textile wet processing units, and understand how to better address critical topics such as Chemical Management and Wastewater Management in the factory with Effluent Treatment Plant.”

17 September, Hong Kong: Environmental Awareness Training: “Know the requirements to control & reduce the environmental risks in the textile wet processing units, and understand how to better address critical topics such as Chemical Management and Wastewater Management in the factory with Effluent Treatment Plant.”

19 September, Hong Kong: Chemical Management Training: “What are the key requirements in terms of proper chemical management in a textile factory to reduce the environmental & social risks?”

20 – 21 September, Dhaka, Bangladesh: Global Textile Forum – Gearing up for New Generation Textiles: “Global Textile Forum is an initiative, a platform to promote region’s textile and garment industry through Collaborative efforts.”

20 – 21 September: Sacramento: WB/Camp on Water-Based Printing: “first-of-its-kind summit on water-based ink printing, powered by the Specialty Graphic Imaging Association’s (SGIA) THREADX conference. Hosted by Motion Textile.”

09 – 10 October, San Diego: The Responsible Business Summit West 2019: “The Responsible Business Summit West focuses on what business needs to do to show leadership on key social and environmental challenges and opportunities.”

11 October, Coimbatore: Top Ten Best Practices – ZDHC: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should contact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

15 – 18 October: Vancouver: Textile Exchange Sustainability Conference: Driving impact through integrity and preferred fiber & materials.

16 October, Delhi: Top Ten Best Practices – ZDHC: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should con tact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

21 – 25 October, Turin: International Labour Standards and Corporate Social Responsibility: “course offered by the International Training Centre of the ILO.”

23 October, Dhaka: Higg FEM 3.0 training: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should contact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

23 – 24 October: Amsterdam: European Textile Polyester Summit 2019: “an insight into the European polyester market and its drivers and developments, as well as focus on feedstock availability and sustainability challenges.”

29 October, Shanghai: Top Ten Best Practices – ZDHC: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should contact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

29 – 30 October: Washington DC: “Brands Taking Stands – What’s next?”: “bringing corporate leaders together on a fast-paced main stage, keenly focused on the ‘why’ and ‘how’ behind their thinking.”

30 October, Istanbul: Top Ten Best Practices – ZDHC: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should con tact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

01 November: Hong Kong: Crisis Management & Modern Slavery: “[The Mekong Club’s] intensive 3.5-hour workshop will equip you with the right tools to anticipate and prepare for a crisis, and teach you how to use crisis management principles effectively. A realistic modern slavery crisis scenario will be used so participants can practice these principles.”

04 – 05 November: Stockholm: Transforming Products for the Circular Economy: “This two-day forum will feature leading innovators, product designers, manufacturers and brands using Cradle to Cradle Certified to design and make safe, healthy materials and products for the circular economy.”

05 November: Dhaka, Bangladesh: Sustainable Apparel Forum: 2nd edition of a forum facilitated by the Bangladesh Apparel Exchange.

07 November, Chennai: 1 Day Chemical Compliance & Product Safety in the Supply Chain: “Manufacturers and suppliers who attend this one-day course can understand the importance of RSL and MRSL obligations for their business, key restricted substances and topical global legislation, as well as best practice guidance for implementation of MRSL compliance to satisfy the leather, footwear and apparel industries.”

12 – 14 November, San Jose, California: BSR Conference: “The 27th annual BSR Conference, one of the longest-running and most prestigious sustainable business events. This year, we will explore the transformations that are creating a new climate for business and help to pave the way for companies, people, and planet to thrive in this era of rapid change.”

20 November, Delhi: Higg FEM 3.0 training: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should contact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

20 November, Hong Kong: Half Day Sustainability in the Leather Supply Chain Training Course: This half-day leather sustainability course covers key aspects of traceability and material sourcing, chemical management risks, environmental impacts and stewardship, NGO activity and the leather life cycle.”

22 November, Coimbatore: Higg FEM 3.0 training: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should contact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

26 November, Dhaka: Higg FEM 3.0 training: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should contact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

11 – 12 December, Istanbul: Chemical Management - ZDHC: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should contact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

11 – 12 February, Cologne: 1st International Conference on Cellulose Fibres: “New International Conference on Cellulose Fibres, the fastest growing fibre group in textiles, the largest investment sector in the bio-based economy and the solution for avoiding microplastics.”

11 March, London: Drapers Sustainable Fashion 2020: “[With a] focus on collaborating for change within the fashion retail industry.”

(Photo by Andrew Martin, CCO)

Disclaimer: The Fashion Sustainability Week in Review (FSWIR) is a twice-weekly roundup of sustainability news items relevant to the fashion, apparel, textile and related industries. The views and opinions expressed in the FSWIR by individual authors and/or media outlets cited do not necessarily reflect the position of GoBlu International or any individual associated with the company.

 

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