THIS ISSUE  

Brands in this issue include: Alabama Chanin (bringing ethical fashion back to Alabama), Benetton, C&A and H&M (respond to Bangladesh factory dismissals), Gap (partners with USAID for water in India), Gucci (claims carbon neutral status for entire supply chain), Hollister (launches anti-bullying campaign), Hugo Boss (announces partnership with Cotton made in Africa), Kering (men eligible for 14-week parental leave), Levi Strauss and Outerknown (debut cottonized hemp), Primark (how sustainable is its sustainable cotton program), Uniqlo (under fire in Spain over factory workers; and launching ethnic line in India), and more.

Recently released reports:

In general news:

  • Fashion for Good selects new group of innovators

  • Consumers say sustainable fast fashion is down to brands

  • Garment factories still unsafe, seven years after fatal fire

  • Asia’s sustainable fashion industry on the rise with new us$60 million supply chain fund

  • Kingpins Transformers targets university students with new sustainability conference in London

  • Sustainable fashion brands look to certification as a competitive differentiator

  • How can brands speed up their transition to sustainability?

  • Sustainable shopping is good for the environment, but it’s even better for workers

  • Germany unveils “Green Button” for textile industry

  • Second-hand fashion hits 187 million pounds on eBay

  • Much work ahead to achieve sustainable fashion industry, says KPMG report

  • Fast fashion is costlier than we'd like to admit (Dana Thomas’s new book)

  • UK consumers don’t think it’s their responsibility to ensure a sustainable fashion industry

  • Opinion: A cotton textiles success story

  • BFC creates Institute of Positive Fashion to accelerate sustainability

  • Sustainability is no longer an exception in sports – it is the norm

  • Katherine Ryan slams Love Island clothing collaborations: ‘How many outfits can I buy for a pound?’

In the supply chain

  • Bangladesh: Benetton, C&A and H&M respond to factory dismissals; and a profile on Dolly Akhtar who fought back against sexual harassment

  • India: garment workers to protest for minimum wages

  • Myanmar: thousands of garment workers demand measures to reduce labour disputes

Manufacturers in this issue include: DyStar (details 2018 sustainability progress), Saitex (achieves B Corp certification), Soorty (sustainability as an element of business), and more.

Sustainable fashion jobs: 9 new job listed this issue (at C&A, Indigo, Kering, Nike, Oxford Products, SML, Target, The North Face, and Uniqlo).

By Stephen Frost, CUHK Business School, The Chinese University of Hong Kong.

FROM ECOTEXTILE NEWS 

Activists urged to spam Uniqlo over jobless factory workers: “An NGO is urging activists to spam fashion brand Uniqlo with social media messages - urging the company to pay severance money to garment workers who lost their jobs in Indonesia - on the day it opens a key new store in Milan. The Labour Behind the Label initiative wants people to spam Uniqlo as it opens its first store in the Italian fashion capital on Friday 13th September” (12 Sep).

Gucci claims carbon neutral status for entire supply chain: “Gucci has announced plans to make its own operations and its entire supply chain carbon neutral by offsetting greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through supporting forest conservation projects” (12 Sep).

Garment factories still unsafe, seven years after fatal fire: “Seven years after a deadly fire claimed the lives of more than 250 people at a garment factory in Pakistan, workers continue to risk their lives in deathtrap workplaces, according to a new report. Few lessons have been learned from the Ali Enterprises factory fire in the city of Karachi in September 2012, according to the report by the Clean Clothes Campaign, the International Labour Rights Forum, the Labour Education Foundation, the National Trade Union Federation, and the Pakistan Institute of Labour Education and Research” (12 Sep).

Consumers say sustainable fast fashion is down to brands: “Consumers in the UK are concerned about making fast fashion more sustainable - but think the responsibility rests with brands rather than changing their own behaviour, according to a new survey” (11 Sep).

DyStar details 2018 sustainability progress: “Chemicals supplier DyStar has released its Sustainability Performance Report for the 2018 financial year, in which it breaks down progress made relating to both its social and environmental actions over the past 12 months” (10 Sep).

Fashion for Good selects new group of innovators: “A new batch of 12 innovators in sustainable fashion has been selected to join the Fashion for Good - Plug and Play Accelerator Programme. They will participate in a robust curriculum over the next 12 weeks, including mentoring and industry expertise from Fashion for Good and its corporate partners to catalyse their ideas into the mainstream fashion ecosystem” (10 Sep).

BRANDS & RETAILERS

Gucci says it’s now carbon-neutral: ““To build on longstanding efforts to reduce environmental impacts and drive positive change,” it said, “Gucci announced today that it is offsetting all remaining Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions annually from its own operations and the entire supply chain through four critically important projects that support forest conservation around the world. As an unprecedented commitment to sustainability leadership in luxury and fashion, Gucci’s supply chain has become carbon-neutral”” (12 Sep).

Hollister launches anti-bullying campaign for back-to-school season: “The teen label, which is a division of Abercrombie & Fitch Co., has teamed up with the organization DoSomething.org to launch ‘Cancel Bullying,' a campaign designed to fight bullying with positivity” (11 Sep).

Hugo Boss announces partnership with Cotton made in Africa: “Cotton made in Africa (CmiA) is expanding its network of cooperation partners and brands to include Hugo Boss. This partnership will see the premium-segment fashion firm develop a series of new products that will hit the shelves next spring” (11 Sep).

How sustainable is Primark’s sustainable cotton program?Primark has announced the expansion of its Sustainable Cotton Programme to 160,000 farmers across India, Pakistan and China who will be trained in more ecologically friendly practices by the end of 2022 … So what does the scheme really mean for cotton farmers and the environment?” (10 Sep).

Kering makes men eligible for 14-week parental leave: “According to a press release published on Tuesday, the nearly 35,000 employees of the Kering group worldwide, both men and women, will be entitled to a 14-week parental leave, fully paid by the luxury group, for births or adoptions of children” (10 Sep).

Levi’s, Outerknown debut cottonized hemp in ‘true blue’ indigo denim: “Levi Strauss and Outerknown are doubling down on cottonized hemp, this time by integrating traditional indigo-dyeing techniques to create “true blue” denim” (09 Sep).

USAID initiative to improve access to drinking water to 2 lakh women in India: “The Women + Water Alliance — initiated by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the US-based apparel company Gap Inc — is planning to increase its social activities in India to provide more support to women in minimizing water woes. The alliance’s representatives met Union jal shakti minister Gajendra Singh Shekhawat last week at World Water Week at Stockholm and urged him to approve its plan to assist more women under the ongoing project” (09 Sep).

Is this small town the future of ethical fashion? “In the northwest corner of Alabama, across the Tennessee River from R&B recording mecca Muscle Shoals, is Florence, a town of 39,000. Before NAFTA, Florence was the Cotton T-shirt Capital of the World … After the passage of NAFTA, U.S. T-shirt production moved offshore. Local manufacturers like Tee Jays ceased operations. Florence, like much of the textile-driven South, plunged into financial and social crisis. “In 1993, 5,000 worked in this two-block radius,” [Natalie] Chanin said. “And that didn’t include all the service industries — restaurants, day-care centers, gas stations. There used to be 20 dye houses in this town. When manufacturing collapsed here, everything collapsed … At The Factory, Chanin and her team of 30 run Alabama Chanin, a womenswear brand specializing in flowing organic-cotton dresses and smart tailoring, all produced in the region.” (09 Sep).

Japan’s fast fashion brand Uniqlo to retail ethnic line in India: “Japan’s fast fashion brand Uniqlo which plans to open its first store in India this October will launch an ethnic wear line in the country. This will be a kurta collection that will include tunics, dresses, pants and stoles. The collection features polkas juxtaposed with twill checks, developed using hand-woven yarn dye and block printing. The designs use premium linen, 100 per cent cotton and a specially-created rayon fabric to make daily care even easier” (06 Sep).

NEWS & REPORTS   

Asia’s sustainable fashion industry on the rise with new us$60 million supply chain fund: “Sustainable fashion is on the rise in Asia, with global sustainability initiative Fashion For Good revealing a new investment fund at the 2019 Hong Kong Fashion Summit to encourage the development of lower impact fashion throughout the industry’s supply chain. This is a step forward for Asia, proving that sustainable innovation is not just taking off in Europe or North America, but right here at our doorstep too” (12 Sep).

Kingpins Transformers targets university students with new sustainability conference in London: “The first edition of Kingpins Transformers: Ed, the new one-day conference for university students highlighting sustainability in the denim supply chain, kicks off at London’s Ravensbourne University on October 18” (11 Sep).

Sustainable fashion brands look to certification as a competitive differentiator: “With more brands touting sustainable initiatives as part of their brand stories, it might make you wonder: How can you distinguish a brand that’s truly committed to environmental efforts versus those who are just jumping on board with the feel-good angle? Clothing retailers have been wrestling with this question themselves, and now, some are looking to various sustainability certifications as a solution to the problem. (11 Sep).

How can brands speed up their transition to sustainability? “As part of its series of conferences on the theme of a more responsible fashion industry, the trade show Who’s Next, which ran in Paris until September 9, invited Maéva Bessis to speak on the subject of how brands can transition to be more sustainable. The executive director of La Caserne, the future accelerator for sustainable fashion which will open its doors in January 2021, called on seven fashion industry names to discuss the issue”  (11 Sep).

Sustainable shopping is good for the environment, but it’s even better for workers: “It’s easier than ever to buy eco-friendly products, whether it’s shoes made of recycled ocean plastic or fast fashion dresses made from sustainably sourced wood fibers. And yet, all too often, the human beings that toil to make our clothes get left out of our clamouring to save the planet. While sustainable products proliferate, sweatshop-free products remain as illusive as ever” (11 Sep).

Germany unveils “Green Button” for textile industry: “A new textile seal called the “Green Button” should help advance social and ecological standards across borders, according to German Minister of Economic Cooperation and Development Gerd Mueller who presented the label on Monday. Companies that wanted to use the green button label for their textile product would need to comply with 26 minimum social and ecological standards set out by the German development ministry” (10 Sep).

Second-hand fashion hits 187 million pounds on eBay: “Ebay has revealed that the UK second-hand fashion market is experiencing a 187 million pound boom as the ‘Blue Planet effect’ prompts UK consumers to ‘close the loop’ on fast fashion” (10 Sep).

Much work ahead to achieve sustainable fashion industry, says KPMG report: “Much work remains to be done towards building a sustainable fashion industry according to a new report by KPMG, together with Fashion Summit and HSBC. For example, fewer than 15 per cent of participating companies were able to report their supply chain-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, vital in formulating better climate strategies. Measuring GHG emissions can be very complex, and may prove a challenge for many of the signatories, as supply chain data may be harder to access” (10 Sep). [Ed’s note: see report here.]

Fast fashion is costlier than we'd like to admit. Dana Thomas' Fashionopolis shines a light on the dark side of getting dressed: “[In her] new book Fashionopolis: The Price of Fast Fashion and the Future of Clothes, [Dana] Thomas points her proverbial lens at the moral decay of industrial manufacturing, and the havoc it has wreaked on both humanity and the environment” (10 Sep).

  • The environment and economy are paying the price for fast fashion — but there’s hope: “Dana Thomas, a veteran journalist who has written for the Washington Post, the New York Times, and the Wall Street Journal, among others, doesn’t mince statistics in the early chapters of Fashionopolis: The Prices of Fast Fashion and the Future of Clothes. “Fast fashion” — which is to say cheap, disposable clothing, made indiscriminately, imprudently, and often without consideration for environmental and labor conditions by companies like Zara, H&M, Forever 21, Nasty Gal, and Fashion Nova — is a disease, and both the planet and its people are paying the price” (12 Sep).

UK consumers don’t think it’s their responsibility to ensure a sustainable fashion industry: “A new study by Streetbees, the global intelligence platform, reveals the truth behind consumers’ attitudes towards the fashion industry. Is sustainable and ethical manufacturing a true consideration, or do people say they care but let the responsibility of compliance lie with someone else? The research, which included 1,552 people across the UK, finds that the debate around fast fashion continues to raise more questions than it does answers. Over half of respondents rate sustainability as important or very important to them when buying clothes but when it comes to taking responsibility, Brits appear to shy away from the spotlight” (10 Sep).

Opinion: A cotton textiles success story: “[Arun] Agarwal was impressed with the oil absorbency performance of the cotton based Towelie oil absorbent product, which he was introduced to a few months back. He noted that products like Towelie clearly promote the sustainable industrial applications of cotton. Agarwal’s Nextt is a $500 million company that supplies cotton home textiles to giant retailers like Walmart, Costco and Kohl’s, to name a few. In revealing the secret to his success, he simply stated, “Providing cost effective solutions to customers’ requirements greatly helps”” (10 Sep).

BFC creates Institute of Positive Fashion to accelerate sustainability: “The British Fashion Council has brought together various existing sustainability initiatives and programmes under a new organisation called Institute of Positive Fashion (IPF)” (10 Sep).

Sustainability is no longer an exception in sports – it is the norm: “Consumer wishes have changed in recent years – and the sports industry has adapted to them. The participants of ISPO Textrends Spring/Summer 2020/21 showed that sustainability is essential for new sportswear. Developments are becoming more and more creative” (09 Sep).

Katherine Ryan slams Love Island clothing collaborations: ‘How many outfits can I buy for a pound?’: “Katherine Ryan has gone in on former Love Island stars and their ubiquitous clothing collaborations, calling them out for the dangers of fast fashion. Introducing the year’s best television at the 2019 TV Choice Awards, the comedian took to the stage and said: ‘Is anyone from Love Island still together? ‘ To cheers from the audience, she continued: ‘Really? Which of you has clothing lines and how many different outfits can I buy for a pound? ‘My 10-year-old daughter is looking for a job in a factory’” (09 Sep).

SUPPLY CHAIN 

Bangladesh 

Union alleges 700+ garment workers dismissed from factory producing for C&A, H&M & Benetton were targeted for union activities; Incl. co. responses: “In August 2019, 701 garment workers at SF Denim Apparels (SF Denim) in Dhaka, Bangladesh, were fired en masse after the factory - which produces for Benetton, C&A and H&M - cited a shortage of orders from international brands. According to local trade union Sommilito Garments Sramik Federation (SGSF), the affected workers were targeted due to their involvement in union activities following consistent efforts by the factory to obstruct efforts to organise and form a union. Among the dismissed garment workers, 30 are pregnant. SGSF has called for maternity benefits to be paid and for all the dismissed workers to be reinstated. SF Denim has rejected the allegation of targeting workers for involvement with a trade union and said it fired the workers in accordance with the law. In September 2019, Business & Human Rights Resource Centre invited Benetton, C&A and H&M to respond to the mass dismissal of garment workers at SF Denim and claims that workers were targeted as a result of their union engagement” (11 Sep).

#MeToo Bangladesh: the textile workers uniting against harassment: “Women routinely face sexual assault and exploitation in factories, many of which supply western brands. A grassroots movement is helping victims to seek justice … Sick of the harassment, Akhtar decided to fight back. She went on to spearhead efforts to form a union in the factory where she worked so that other young women would be better protected. When management got wind of her efforts, her supervisor locked her in his office for hours until she signed a resignation letter” (10 Sep).

India

Bengaluru: Garment workers to protest for minimum wages: “Thousands of garment workers have organised a protest on Thursday in front of the Labour Department office here demanding minimum wages. All workers, except garment sector employees, earn a monthly income of Rs 11,557. The garment sector employs 85% of women in its workforce and the number of employees runs into lakhs. However, workers are paid less than minimum wages fixed by the government” (12 Sep).

Myanmar

Thousands of garment workers demand measures to reduce labour disputes: “About ten thousand garment workers staged a protest in the town of Pathein, Ayeyawady Region, on September 8 calling for measures to reduce labour disputes between employees and employers and promote mechanism to seek solutions” (09 Sep).

MANUFACTURERS   

Soorty Enterprises: Sustainability as an element of business: “Soorty Enterprises is conducting an array of innovative sustainability strategies and technologies, along with a robust CSR programme, to establish itself as the leading sustainable denim manufacture” (10 Sep).

Saitex achieves B Corp certification: “Saitex, recognised as the ‘world’s cleanest denim factory’ has become the only large scale denim manufacturer in the world to receive B Corp distinction, after achieving a score of 105.6” (09 Sep).

SUSTAINABLE FASHION JOBS

[New listings or updated information marked with *]

Amaro: Sustainability & Social Impact Lead (São Paulo)

Amazon: Social Responsibility, Senior Program Manager (Shenzhen, China)

Arcadia Group: Ethical Trade Manager (London)

Ascena: Analyst Community & Philanthropy (New York)

Asos: Ethical Trade Assistant (Hong Kong)

BSR: HERproject Associate (Hong Kong)

BSR: Manager, Supply Chain Sustainability (New York)

* C&A Sourcing: Environmental Project Manager (Hong Kong)

C&A Sourcing: Chemicals Project Manager (Hong Kong)

C&A Sourcing: SSC Manager for China Sourcing Office (Shanghai)

C&A Foundation: Data Analyst (Gurgaon)

Canada Goose: Manager Fabrics Research, Development, Sustainability (Toronto)

Canada Goose: Sustainability Programs Specialist (Toronto)

Canada Goose: Sr. Materials Developer, Fabric Research, Development & Sustainability (Toronto)

CIEL Textile Company: Sustainability Officer (Mauritius)

Center for Child Rights and Corporate Social Responsibility (CCR CSR): Social Worker (Shenzhen)

Copenhagen Fashion Week: Bæredygtighedspraktikant (Copenhagen)

Cutso: Lead Developer - Sustainable Fashion Marketplace (London)

Decathlon China: Supplier Quality Engineer (Shenzhen)

Disney: Director, Environmental Science And Policy Analysis (Glendale, CA)

Disney: Manager, Audit Analysis, ILS (Glendale, CA)

Global Brands Group: Social & Environmental Affairs Assistant (London)

Global Brands Group: Social & Environmental Affairs Officer (London)

Good Weave: Director, Apparel and Fashion Jewelry (Washington DC)

GoodWeave: Program Assistant (Washington DC)

Guess: Apparel Testing & Environmental Sustainability Specialist (Bioggio)

H&M: Country - Sustainability Developer (Environment) (Guangzhou)

House of Anita Dongre: Fashion Designer – Sustainability (Mumbai)

Hugo Boss: Corporate Sustainability Manager (Metzingen)

ÏDKIDS: CSR Internship (Supplier Social Audits) (Pas-en-Artois)

Impactt: Senior Consultant – Social Auditing (London)

* Indigo: Specialist, Product Quality & Sustainability (Toronto)

ISKO: CSR Marketing Expert (London)

JCPenney: Project Specialist – Corporate Social Responsibility (Plano, TX)

* Kering: Project Coordinator (London)

Kmart Australia: Human Rights Manager (Melbourne)

Levi Strauss: Manager, Global Product Strategy (San Francisco, CA)

Levi Strauss Foundation: Program Coordinator (San Francisco, CA)

Li & Fung: Assistant Manager - Vendor Compliance (Hong Kong)

Lojas Renner: Sustainability Environmental Analyst (Shanghai)

Lululemon: Director, Chemicals & Materials Sustainability (Vancouver)

Michael Kors: Manager, Corporate Social Responsibility (New York)

Nakd: Corporate Social Responsibility Internship (Gothenburg)

NCBI Retail: Corporate Sustainability Manager (Naas)

* Nike: Sustainabilty Professional II (Jakarta)

Nike: Environmental Health & Safety Manager - Air MI (Phoenix, AZ)

Nike: Community Impact Director Latam (Mexico City)

* Oxford Products: Compliance Administrator (Hong Kong)

Pegas Nonwovens: Global Safety, Regulatory and Sustainability Specialist (Znojmo)

PVH: Corporate Responsibility Coordinator (Amsterdam)

PVH: Manager, Environmental Sustainability & Product Stewardship (New York)

Ralph Lauren: Manager, Sustainability (New York)

Ralph Lauren: Associate, Global Employee Communications & Philanthropy (New York)

QuizRR: Internal Sales Representative (Stockholm)

REI: Director, Communications and Public Affairs (Kent WA)

s.Oliver: Senior Global Sustainability Manager Environment & Chemical Compliance (Rottendorf)

SAXX Underwear: Product Quality and Compliance Manager (Portland, OR)

* SML: Manager – Global Sustainability (Hong Kong)

Solidarity Center: Senior Specialist for Organizing – Trade Union Strengthening Department (Phnom Penh)

Steve Madden: Social Compliance Manager (Long Island City, NY)

Superdry: Executive Assistant to Sourcing and Sustainability Director (Cheltenham)

Sustainable Apparel coalition: Operations Coordinator, Europe (Amsterdam)

TAL Apparel: Environmental Sustainability Executive (Hong Kong)

* Target: Regional Director Production Safty & Quality Assurance (PSQA) (Shanghai)

* The North Face: Director, Global Sustainability (Denver, CO)

Tommy Hilfiger: Communications Manager Sustainability (Amsterdam)

Turnahead: Sustainability Manager (Bangladesh)

* Uniqlo: Sustainability Officer (Bangkok)

University of Leeds: Research Fellow in Sustainable Materials and Renewable Fibres (Leeds)

Unravelau: Internship Sustainability Researcher (Utrecht)

Velcro Companies: EHS Manager (Somersworth, NH)

Vetta Brands: Corporate Social Responsibility & Sustainability Analyst (Columbus, OH)

VF: Manager, Worker Rights (Hong Kong)

Walmart: Senior Manager, Corporate Social Responsibility (Beijing)

WSR: Director of Outreach and Communications (New York)

ZDHC: Legal Intern (Amsterdam)

CONFERENCES & SEMINARS                                        

[New listings or updated information marked with *]  

17 September, Hong Kong: Environmental Awareness Training: “Know the requirements to control & reduce the environmental risks in the textile wet processing units, and understand how to better address critical topics such as Chemical Management and Wastewater Management in the factory with Effluent Treatment Plant.”

17 – 18 September, Northampton, UK: Leather Training Course: “The improved understanding you will gain from this leather course will help you avoid problems when sourcing and specifying leather products as well as providing confidence when dealing with suppliers, manufacturers and tanners.”

19 September, Hong Kong: Chemical Management Training: “What are the key requirements in terms of proper chemical management in a textile factory to reduce the environmental & social risks?”

20 – 21 September, Dhaka, Bangladesh: Global Textile Forum – Gearing up for New Generation Textiles: “Global Textile Forum is an initiative, a platform to promote region’s textile and garment industry through Collaborative efforts.”

20 – 21 September: Sacramento: WB/Camp on Water-Based Printing: “first-of-its-kind summit on water-based ink printing, powered by the Specialty Graphic Imaging Association’s (SGIA) THREADX conference. Hosted by Motion Textile.”

09 October, Northampton, UK: Leather Training Course: “The improved understanding you will gain from this leather course will help you to avoid problems when sourcing and specifying leather products as well as providing confidence when dealing with suppliers, manufacturers, and tanners.”

09 – 10 October, San Diego: The Responsible Business Summit West 2019: “The Responsible Business Summit West focuses on what business needs to do to show leadership on key social and environmental challenges and opportunities.”

10 October, Northampton, UK: Chemical Compliance and Product Safety Training Course: “On this chemical course, our in-house chemical expert will guide you through the various legislations and chemicals in a simple step-by-step process, ensuring that you are aware of your obligation and how to comply.”

10 – 15 October, Los Angeles: Vegan Fashion Week: “This event is designed to empower conscious brands and humans globally with an elevated platform for achievement, inspiration, and discovery.”

11 October, Coimbatore: Top Ten Best Practices – ZDHC: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should contact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

15 – 18 October: Vancouver: Textile Exchange Sustainability Conference: Driving impact through integrity and preferred fiber & materials.

16 October, Delhi: Top Ten Best Practices – ZDHC: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should con tact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

* 18 October, London: Kingpin Transformers: Ed: “the first of what we hope will be an annual educational conference focusing on fashion students who are still at university and are about to enter the wider fashion industry.”

21 – 25 October, Turin: International Labour Standards and Corporate Social Responsibility: “course offered by the International Training Centre of the ILO.”

* 22 October, Amsterdam: Kingpins Transformers: Catalysts: “At our Catalysts edition of Kingpins Transformers, we will spotlight the members of the denim supply chain focused on redefining the rules for the future.”

23 October, Dhaka: Higg FEM 3.0 training: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should contact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

23 – 24 October: Amsterdam: European Textile Polyester Summit 2019: “an insight into the European polyester market and its drivers and developments, as well as focus on feedstock availability and sustainability challenges.”

29 October, Shanghai: Top Ten Best Practices – ZDHC: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should contact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

29 – 30 October: Washington DC: “Brands Taking Stands – What’s next?”: “bringing corporate leaders together on a fast-paced main stage, keenly focused on the ‘why’ and ‘how’ behind their thinking.”

30 October, Istanbul: Top Ten Best Practices – ZDHC: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should con tact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

01 November: Hong Kong: Crisis Management & Modern Slavery: “[The Mekong Club’s] intensive 3.5-hour workshop will equip you with the right tools to anticipate and prepare for a crisis, and teach you how to use crisis management principles effectively. A realistic modern slavery crisis scenario will be used so participants can practice these principles.”

04 – 05 November: Stockholm: Transforming Products for the Circular Economy: “This two-day forum will feature leading innovators, product designers, manufacturers and brands using Cradle to Cradle Certified to design and make safe, healthy materials and products for the circular economy.”

05 November: Dhaka, Bangladesh: Sustainable Apparel Forum: 2nd edition of a forum facilitated by the Bangladesh Apparel Exchange.

07 November, Chennai: 1 Day Chemical Compliance & Product Safety in the Supply Chain: “Manufacturers and suppliers who attend this one-day course can understand the importance of RSL and MRSL obligations for their business, key restricted substances and topical global legislation, as well as best practice guidance for implementation of MRSL compliance to satisfy the leather, footwear and apparel industries.”

12 – 14 November, San Jose, California: BSR Conference: “The 27th annual BSR Conference, one of the longest-running and most prestigious sustainable business events. This year, we will explore the transformations that are creating a new climate for business and help to pave the way for companies, people, and planet to thrive in this era of rapid change.”

13 November, New York: Leather, Compliance & Sustainability New York Conference (organised by Eurofins | BLC and held at Tapestry HQ): “Calling all brands and retailers: How to ensure your brand is compliant with chemistry legislation and can take advantage of the opportunity of adding value through sustainability.”

14 November, Brussels: Ready, Set, Substitute it Now!ChemSec invites you to a full-day event, which will include messages from policy makers, inspiration from progressive companies and hard facts from scientists, as well as panel discussions and workshops on how to best substitute hazardous chemicals.”

20 November, Delhi: Higg FEM 3.0 training: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should contact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

20 November, Hong Kong: Half Day Sustainability in the Leather Supply Chain Training Course: This half-day leather sustainability course covers key aspects of traceability and material sourcing, chemical management risks, environmental impacts and stewardship, NGO activity and the leather life cycle.”

22 November, Coimbatore: Higg FEM 3.0 training: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should contact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

26 November, Dhaka: Higg FEM 3.0 training: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should contact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

03 December, Northampton, UK: Leather Training Course: “The improved understanding you will gain from this leather course will help you to avoid problems when sourcing and specifying leather products as well as providing confidence when dealing with suppliers, manufacturers, and tanners.”

11 – 12 December, Istanbul: Chemical Management - ZDHC: Training by Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS) – Those interested in attending should contact: roy.rima@sustexsolutions.com

11 – 12 February, Cologne: 1st International Conference on Cellulose Fibres: “New International Conference on Cellulose Fibres, the fastest growing fibre group in textiles, the largest investment sector in the bio-based economy and the solution for avoiding microplastics.”

11 March, London: Drapers Sustainable Fashion 2020: “[With a] focus on collaborating for change within the fashion retail industry.”

(Photo by lefteye81, CCO)

Disclaimer: The Fashion Sustainability Week in Review (FSWIR) is a twice-weekly roundup of sustainability news items relevant to the fashion, apparel, textile and related industries. The views and opinions expressed in the FSWIR by individual authors and/or media outlets cited do not necessarily reflect the position of GoBlu International or any individual associated with the company.

 

Comment